Hands-Free is Not Risk Free - Safe Ride 4 Kids

Hands-Free is Not Risk Free

NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) says distracted driving is a dangerous epidemic on America’s roadways. At any moment 9 percent of drivers are talking on a cell phone. 26 percent of crashes involved being distracted on a phone including on “hands-free.”

In 2018 2,841 people were killed in distracted driving crashes (1,730 drivers, 605 passengers, 400 pedestrians and 77 bicyclists). This is a lower number than previous years but could still be reduced.

Many states in the U.S. have laws regulating the use of mobile devices while driving. Some laws only include some drivers (like commercial drivers or bus drivers). Most laws affect all drivers. Some laws target handheld devices only, while other laws affect both handheld and hands-free devices. For instance in our state of Colorado all drivers are prohibited from texting or being on the internet but driver’s under the age of 18 are also prohibited from driving and talking on a cell phone.

Sign up our newsletter for car seat safety and other driving safety updates.

We all know texting is dangerous while driving. Your hands are off the wheel and your eyes are off the road. But texting entails more than a manual or visual distraction. It is also a cognitive distraction.

Talking on the phone is also a distraction. While talking you can remain looking at the road and in hands-free mode you can keep your hands on the wheel, there is still that cognitive distraction aspect. Even talking hands free on the phone is a dangerous distraction.

Vision is the most important sense for safe driving. Yet, drivers talking on phones, including those using hands-free phones, have a tendency to “look at” but not “see” objects, according to the National Safety Council. The National Safety Council has compiled studies and reports by scientists around the world to compare driver performance with handheld and hands-free phones and found hands-free phones offer no safety benefit when driving. They go into detail about this and how multitasking is a myth in this paper.

Copyright 2020 Safe Ride 4 Kids. All rights reserved. You may not publish, broadcast, rewrite or redistribute this material without permission. You are welcome to link to Safe Ride 4 Kids or share on social media.

We originally published this post in April 2014. We updated the article for accuracy and comprehensiveness and with an updated inforgraph.

No Comments

Post A Comment

Stay Updated!

Sign up for our monthly newsletter.

news, updates, promotions

Thank you and welcome!
You have been subscribed.

us map car seat law updates

Subscribe for Updates

Get news and updates including updates on changes in state car seat laws by subscribing to our monthly newsletter.

Thank you for Subscribing! We'll see you at our next newsletter! 

4+ Stages of car seats

Get a basic understanding of the 4(+) Stages of Child Restraints your child will go through over the years with this cheat sheet.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

10 mistakes report

Do you know for sure if your kids are riding in the car safe?

After all 3 out of 4 of all car seats are being used incorrectly and 93% of newborns are in their car seats with critical errors. Learn how to fix the most common car seat mistakes with this report.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

make every arrival a safe arrival

Enter your name and email then click the button below to pledge and receive our news, tips and updates.

Thank you for Subscribing! We'll see you at our next newsletter! 

safer driving during pregnancy

Find out everything you need to know about the risks involved with driving during pregnancy and how to keep you and your baby as safe as possible in the car.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Get car seat and child safety updates, tips and reminders with our monthly newsletter. You'll also get new product and promotion announcements first.

Thank you for Subscribing! We'll see you at our next newsletter!